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Reed, Lawrence capture 2016 Ironman 70.3 world titles

Reed, Lawrence win 2016 Ironman 70.3 World Championships

04/09/2016 at 08:21Updated 04/09/2016 at 08:22

Australian Tim Reed takes out the coveted Ironman 70.3 world championship on home soil as Briton Holly Lawrence claims the women’s crown…

It was an outstanding Father’s Day in Australia for local hero Tim Reed as he sprinted across the line just two seconds ahead two-time champion Sebastian Kienle (GER) in an amazing come-from-behind win at the 2016 Ironman 70.3 World Championships in Queensland on Sunday, September 4.

Reed crossed the line in a time of 3 hours 44 minutes 14 seconds.

Great Britain’s Holly Lawrence also defeated a two-time winner in Melissa Hauschildt (AUS) to claim the elite women’s crown (4:09:12) and join Reed as a first-time world champion.

For the 31-year-old New South Wales native and reigning Australian Ironman champion, the victory marks the 15th 70.3 win of his career, with the last one coming after his successful world title defence at the Asia-Pacific Championships in July.

It was a happy Father's Day in Australia for local hero Tim Reed after winning the Ironman 70.3 World Championship on September 4, 2016 in the Sunshine Coast, Australia - Photo: Matt Roberts/Getty Images

It was a happy Father's Day in Australia for local hero Tim Reed after winning the Ironman 70.3 World Championship on September 4, 2016 in the Sunshine Coast, Australia - Photo: Matt Roberts/Getty ImagesEurosport

“I’m pretty short of words as I just can’t quite believe it,” an exuberant Reed told Eurosport after the race. “I will still be pinching myself in a year’s time.

“As much as I’ve been a pro triathlete, I’ve also been a huge fan of the sport. To be on the same list as some of the greats like Craig Alexander (2006, 2011) Jan Frodeno (2015) and Sebastian Kienle (2012, 2013) is really special.”

Reed has been racing the 70.3 Worlds since 2012, with his previous best result being 5th in 2013. He followed that with 7th in 2014 and 14th last year.

He was nearly a minute behind out of the 1.9km swim led by fellow Aussie Josh Amberger.

However he positioned himself well on the 90km bike, using his strength to close down the gap from strong German riders Kienle and Andreas Dreitz, as well as Bahamian and former pro cyclist Tyler Butterfield.

Reed was just 10 seconds back into transition and quickly pushed into a leading group of four on the run with Kienle, Australian Sam Appleton and German Maurice Clavel.

At the midway point, it was just Reed and Kienle.

“I felt pretty good on the swim and bike,” he explained. “The ride was surgy. There were a couple of times I tried to get away and then other guys tried to get away to split everything up, but it didn’t quite happen. So none of us were getting onto the run quite fresh.

“On the run, I slowly worked my way to Sebby, who was leading the race, and he just said to me let’s work together and make this a race for first and second, and I was very happy to do that.”

Reed admits that even with Kienle’s cooperation, the win – and maybe a podium – was still in doubt after more than three hours on the course.

“We sort of just shared the load for the first 10km and then he started putting in some pretty big surges on me,” explained Reed. “I was just hanging on for dear life. In fact, he actually dropped me, and I think he had a gap for most of the last 6km.

“I was actually scared of getting third place or worse and just thought I had to run as fast as I can to try and bridge back.”

While Reed admits Kienle is a more powerful runner uphill, he was confident if he could maintain contact with 32-year-old over the final climb, he would be able to rally with his own speed on the descent.

“I knew he was very strong going uphill, but I knew I was stronger downhill,” claimed Reed. “I hung with him when he put in a surge on the uphill and went as hard as I could to the finish and managed to come over the top and take the win.

“Every step we took further up that hill I took more confidence out of it,” he continued. “If he was going to drop me then it was going to be on the uphill not the downhill. But to be honest, the confidence literally only came in the last minute of the race.”

Holly Lawrence (GBR) stands atop the podium with Melissa Hauschildt (AUS) and Heather Wurtele (CAN) after her win at the Ironman 70.3 World Championships in Australia on Sunday -Photo: Matt Roberts/Getty Images

Holly Lawrence (GBR) stands atop the podium with Melissa Hauschildt (AUS) and Heather Wurtele (CAN) after her win at the Ironman 70.3 World Championships in Australia on Sunday -Photo: Matt Roberts/Getty ImagesEurosport

It was a different story for Lawrence, who dominated after exiting the water in second place 29 seconds down on American Lauren Brandon.

Lawrence broke away on the bike and used a 2:19:28 split to create a 3:46 gap on Brandon to start the half-marathon. From there, the 26-year-old never looked back, despite Hauschildt surging into second by posting the fastest run of the women (1:18:43).

BRIEF RESULTS

Elite men

1. Tim Reed, AUS, 3:44:14

2. Sebastian Kienle, GER, 3:44:16

3. Ruedi Wild, SUI, 3:44:40

4. Terenzo Bozzone, NZL, 3:45:52

5. Sam Appleton, AUS, 3:46:02

6. Nicholas Kastelein, AUS, 3:46:21

7. Tim Don, GBR, 3:46:32

8. Maurice Clavel, FRA, 3:46:47

9. Lionel Sanders, CAN, 3:47:14

10. Craig Alexander, AUS,  3:47:28

Elite women

1. Holly Lawrence, GBR, 4:09:12

2. Melissa Hauschildt, AUS, 4:11:09

3. Heather Wurtele, CAN, 4:13:36

4. Daniela Ryf, SUI, 4:14:09

5. Caroline Steffen, SUI, 4:17:16

6. Annabel Luxford, AUS, 4:17:26

7. Laura Philipp, GER, 4:17:40

8. Alicia Kaye, USA, 4:17:53

9. Radka Vodickova, CZE, 4:18:17

10. Magali Tisseyre, CAN, 4:18:19

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